it’s no trick of the light
that the passage that Great Grandfather built
shines like gold dust clay

it was only after the rent money
from the Igbos started coming in
that he plastered cement over it all

the gold is there still
gilding the cuneiform windows
and in that part of the passage

where the horses slept
their bodies and tails
brushing the cement away

don’t pity the rusty tin door
which doesn’t quite fit
its doorway skin

its ribbed length has withstood
the ravages of years and rain
and scorching desert light

yes, the half wall in the passage
is a slanted lament
broken and black with damp

but see, the prize is the tiles
placed along the floor
just so by Great Grandmother

each the size of a child’s palm
stepping-stones planted
across a child-sized river

red like bleeding
white like startling
blue like sky

above the passage, clouds
cut by the clothesline
at once a machete, at once a veil

and below, mosaic shards
their shape so specific
so exactly knowing

as if knowing exactly
were a matter
of course

https://beta.publet.com/nowhere-mag/13/9

— Abeer Hoque, “The Passage,” from Nowhere 

fitty1182:

The science of fireworks

fitty1182:

The science of fireworks

theprimolevifanblog:

The first ever (non-periodic) chemical table of the elements, as proposed by John Dalton in 1803. Jöns Jakob Berzelius and Dmitri Mendeleev took this seed of an idea and ran with it, eventually creating the modern periodic table. 
John Dalton (1766-1844) was an Englishman of a modest Quaker background who became one of the rock stars of 19th century science. He is responsible for a good deal of what one learns in high school chemistry: the atomic theory, the law of multiple proportions (atoms combine in particular whole-number ratios to form compounds), and Dalton’s law (the total pressure exerted by a gas mixture is the sum of the partial pressures of the component gases.) He was also the first person to identify colorblindness, which is still sometimes called Dalton’s disease or Daltonism in the UK. 

theprimolevifanblog:

The first ever (non-periodic) chemical table of the elements, as proposed by John Dalton in 1803. Jöns Jakob Berzelius and Dmitri Mendeleev took this seed of an idea and ran with it, eventually creating the modern periodic table. 

John Dalton (1766-1844) was an Englishman of a modest Quaker background who became one of the rock stars of 19th century science. He is responsible for a good deal of what one learns in high school chemistry: the atomic theory, the law of multiple proportions (atoms combine in particular whole-number ratios to form compounds), and Dalton’s law (the total pressure exerted by a gas mixture is the sum of the partial pressures of the component gases.) He was also the first person to identify colorblindness, which is still sometimes called Dalton’s disease or Daltonism in the UK. 

The barnacles which encrust the side
of the wave, cannot hide
there for the submerged shafts of the

sun,
split like spun
glass, move themselves with spotlight swiftness
into the crevices—
in and out, illuminating

the
turquoise sea
of bodies. The water drives a wedge
of iron through the iron edge
of the cliff; whereupon the stars,

pink
rice-grains, ink-
bespattered jelly fish, crabs like green
lilies, and submarine
toadstools, slide each on the other.

http://www.poets.org/poetsorg/poem/fish-1

— Marianne Moore, from “The Fish” 

Only God is truly delicate
Syphilis can judge me
Radium is soft, is that right?
Is that right? The shade never lifted again, the rhododendrons never trimmed
Only God, baby, puts out
Don’t call nobody else
Nobody else owns the feeler

— Michael Ruby, from “Only God Can Judge Me,” American Songbook

Cathy Park Hong, from Dance Dance Revolution 

Cathy Park Hong, from Dance Dance Revolution 

smilesandvials:

Chocolates

thepooranimateddino:

Chinese Periodic Table

thepooranimateddino:

Chinese Periodic Table

fieryredsam:

the science building in my university has PERIODIC TABLES

fieryredsam:

the science building in my university has PERIODIC TABLES

(Source: , via freshphotons)